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Text: Ukaliq the Arctic Hare.
Illustration of an Arctic hare paw print.
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Text: About the Arctic Hare. Photo: An Arctic hare. Text: Heritage, History and Art. Photo: A carving in walrus ivory of an Arctic hare. Text: Studying the Arctic Hare. Photo: David Gray looking through a spotting scope. Text: Games and Activities. Photo: An Arctic hare in mid-hop.
Texts: "About the Arctic Hare", and "Ukaliq" in Inuktitut syllabics. Photos: An Arctic hare and a maple leaf.

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Characteristics

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Individual Behaviour

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Habitat

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Social Behaviour

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Range

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Breeding Behaviour

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Populations

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Life Cycle

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Eat and Be Eaten

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Naming & Classifying
   

Food Web

Image 1) Illustration of an Arctic food web.

 

 

This Arctic food web shows how producers, predators, scavengers and parasites are linked to the Arctic hare (Lepus arcticus). The arrows show the direction of energy flow.

The plant producers are:

  • Arctic willow (Salix arctica)
  • purple saxifrage (Saxifraga oppositifolia)
  • grass (species not identified)
  • sedge (species not identified).

Predators include:

  • Inuk hunter (Homo sapiens)
  • Arctic wolf (Canis lupus)
  • Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus)
  • ermine (Mustela erminea)
  • Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus)
  • Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus)
  • Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus).

Two general parasites, fleas and mosquitoes (species not identified), and decomposers in the form of blow flies (Boreelus atriceps), also derive energy from the Arctic hare.

   
     

 

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Last update: 2015-09-01
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Image credits: 1) Imatics Inc.