Senior Research Assistant, Zoology

Jacqueline Madill

Contact Information

Email: jmadill@mus-nature.ca
Tel: 613.566.4786
Fax: 613.364.4027

Jacqueline Madill is an aquatic zoologist who studies Canada's native freshwater mussels, freshwater snails and the invasive zebra mussel.

Specialties

  • Malacology - Canadian Freshwater Mussels.
  • Hirudinology - Canadian Leeches.

Education

  • B.A., Music, Pedagogy, University of Ottawa, 1999.
  • B.Sc., Zoology, McGill University, 1969.

Profile

Jacqueline Madill © Canadian Museum of Nature

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A live specimen of the Gatineau tadpole snail, Physa gyrina latchfordii, from Philippe Lake, Gatineau Park, Quebec. Picture taken by J. Madill in 2006 using an SZX12 Olympus dissecting microscope. The shell is thin and the ornate pigmentation of the mantle can be seen through the transparent shell.

Jacqueline Madill studies and identifies aquatic animals of Canada, an interest that she has honed since joining the museum in 1973. She is also the museum's champion for Canada's lesser known animals such as microscopic zooplankton, leeches, freshwater mussels and snails. Jacqueline is known internationally as the "Leech Lady" for her expertise in leeches. She has surveyed aquatic life in the Rideau River, the Ottawa River, Lake Ontario, Gatineau Park in Quebec, and the British Columbia coastline.

Jacqueline is currently on a quest to locate populations of the 50 species of freshwater mussels that are native to Canada. Freshwater mussels are the most threatened and endangered group of animals in North America because of habitat loss and pollution.

Professional Services

  • Member, Canadian Society of Zoology, 2007.

Students

Jacqueline Madill © Canadian Museum of Nature

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The Eastern Elliptio, Elliptio complanata, a very common freshwater mussel in Canada. This shell was collected from Meech Lake, Gatineau Park, Québec, and scanned by J. Madill on an Epson scanner in 2003. Madill was the first in North America to use high resolution scanners to create digital images of museum collection shells.

Downloads

Hovingh, P. and Madill, J. The freshwater leeches (Annelida: Hirudinida) of Newfoundland and Labrador. Poster presented at Canadian Society of Zoology Conference, McGill University, Montreal, QC. 2007. nfannelida.jpg (981 Kb jpg).

Links

Peter Hovingh: phovingh@xmission.com; see article by Madill and Hovingh 2007.

Publications

Reports

Madill, J.B., McClelland, C. and Martel, A.L. (2006). Native Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) and the Gatineau Tadpole Snail (Physidae) at Lac Philippe, Gatineau Park (Québec): Distribution and Abundance (2005). Technical Report for the National Capital Commission (NCC). July 2006. 44 pp.

Martel, A.L., Madill, J.B., Ponomarenko, D.S., Deguise, I. and Van Lankveld, N.T. (2006). Native Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) and the Gatineau Tadpole Snail (Physidae) at Lac La Pêche, Gatineau Park (Québec): Distribution and Abundance (2003-2004). Technical Report for the National Capital Commission (NCC). June 2006. 45 pp.

Martel, A.L., Madill, J.B., Ponomarenko, D.S., Pigeon, A. and Van Lankveld, N.T. (2004). Native Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) and the Gatineau Tadpole Snail (Physidae) at Lac Meech, Gatineau Park (Québec): Distribution and Abundance (2001-2003). Technical Report for the National Capital Commission (NCC). March 2004. 45 pp.

Refereed publications

Martel, A.L., McAlpine, D.F., Sabine, D., and Madill, J.B. (accepted). Freshwater Mussels (Unionoidea) in the Atlantic Maritime Ecozone: a Declining Fauna. In McAlpine, D.F. and Smith, M. (eds), Assessment of Species Diversity in the Atlantic Maritime Ecozone. Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network, Burlington. (ms 97 pp).

Madill, J. and Hovingh, P. (2007). Freshwater Leech (Annelida: Hirudinida) Distribution in the Canadian Province of Newfoundland and Labrador and Adjacent Regions: Check-list, New Records, New Pigmentation Forms, and Pleistocene Refugia. Zootaxa 1657: 1-21.

Martel, A.L., Pathy, D.A., Madill, J.B., Renaud, C.B., Dean, S.L. and Kerr, S.J. (2001). Decline and Regional Extirpation of Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) in a Small River System Invaded by Dreissena polymorpha: the Rideau River, 1993-2000. Canadian Journal of Zoology 79: 2181-2191.

Madill, J., Coates, K.A., Wetzel, M.J. and Gelder, S.R. (1992). Common and Scientific Names of Aphononeuran and Clitellate Annelids of the United States and Canada. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 24 (12): 1259-1262.

Madill, J. (1988). New Canadian Records of Leeches (Hirudinea) Parasitic on Fish. The Canadian Field-Naturalist 102: 685-688.

Non-refereed Publications

Martel, A.L. and Madill, J.B. (2006). Seasonality and Surveys of the Gatineau Tadpole Snail, Physa gyrina latchfordi (Physidae) in Gatineau Park, Québec, Canada. Tentacle -IUCN Newsletter, Species Survival Commission, Mollusc Specialist Group 14: 14-15.

Martel, A.L., Madill, J.B. and Schueler, F. (2006). Apparent Refugia of Native Freshwater Mussels in the Upper Rideau River Threatened by Increased Dreissena 15 Years after its Introduction. Tentacle - IUCN Newsletter, Species Survival Commission, Mollusc Specialist Group 14: 32-33.

Madill, J.B. and Martel, A. (2005). Good News about the Gatineau Tadpole Snail in Meech Lake, Gatineau Park, Quebec. The EMAN Monitor 3(1): 12.

Martel, A.L. and Madill, J.B. (2005). The Gatineau Tadpole Snail, Physa gyrina latchfordi, in Meech Lake, Gatineau Park (Québec): a Larger Population than Originally Thought. Tentacle - IUCN Newsletter, Species Survival Commission, Mollusc Specialist Group 13: 3.

Martel, A. and Madill, J.B. (2005). Freshwater Mussels in Gatineau Park Lakes, Southwestern Quebec: Monitoring for the Future. The EMAN Monitor 3(1): 2

Madill, J. (1985). Synopsis Speciorum. Annelida: Hirudinea. Bibliographia Invertebratorum Aquaticorum Canadensium 5: vi, 35 pp.

Frank, P.G., Fournier, J.A. and Madill, J. (1985). Type specimens of invertebrates (Mollusca and Arthropoda excluded) in the National Museum of Natural Sciences, National Museums of Canada. Syllogeus 60: 1-147.

Madill, J. 1983. The Preparation of Leech Specimens: Relaxation is the Key to Preservation. Syllogeus 44: 37-41.