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Vesuvianite

Where in the World?

For geologists, the type of geological formation that is likely to produce a given mineral is much more useful information than the information you find in traditional maps. As a result, they don't tend to create and maintain range maps like, for example, ornithologists do.

Vesuvianite, which is a relatively common mineral, is most often found in metamorphic rocks like marbles and skarns.

Marble is made when a limestone deposit is super-heated by high underground temperatures. Skarns are similar, but have a more few components than marble.

Igneous rocks, which are formed from volcanic magma, may also contain Vesuvianite. Countries with lots of igneous and metamorphic rocks are "hot spots" for Vesuvianite.

Mineralogist Bob Gault with a drawer of specimens from the Jeffrey Mine.

Mineralogist Bob Gault with a drawer of specimens from the Jeffrey Mine.


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